"Solve unsolvable problems by enhancing your creativity"
The Burke/Lonvig Model
Psychologist Stephen Joseph Burke and Artist Asbjorn Lonvig have developed the Burke/Lonvig Model. A model for training CREATIVITY by joining Burke's and Lonvig's core competences in Psychology, Art and Information Technology. A model that enables employees to enhance skills in creativity and enhance an innovative environment. The Burke/Lonvig Model is conducted in seminars held by Burke and Lonvig. Successful Management depends on ultimate creativity and innovative thinking.


 Burke/Lonvig Model in Action Burke/Lonvig in General Psychology in general
MENU - Start here
Stephen Burke CV - and Contact Carl Gustav Jung
Introduction - About the Burke/Lonvig Model
Asbjorn Lonvig CV - and Contact Analytical Psychology
Concepts and Facilities - How it works
The Burke/Lonvig Model - Mandala Industrial Psychology
CRISES Management and Burke/lonvig Model Green IT The Cognitive Profile Model
Download Burke/Lonvig Model Brochures The Open Source Initiative (OSI) Intentionally left blank

"Enhance Creativity"
Lonvig logo


"Enhance Creativity"


This art work has been created by artist Asbjorn Lonvig based the slogan for this campaign.
On our planet, living things are made of cells and each cell has a nucleus - all display circles with centers. The bulb presents only part of a circle, but still it is a mandala.



Red, yellow are widely considered  psychological primary colors.
During the 18th century, as theorists became aware of Isaac Newton's scientific experiments with light and prisms, red and yellow became 2 of three canonical primary colors - supposedly the fundamental sensory qualities that are blended in the perception of all physical colors and equally in the physical mixture of pigments or dyes. This theory became dogma, despite abundant evidence that red and yellow primaries cannot mix all other colors, and has survived in color theory to the present day.





Mandala

The word "mandala" is from the classical Indian language of Sanskrit. Loosely translated to mean "circle," a mandala is far more than a simple shape. It represents wholeness, and can be seen as a model for the organizational structure of life itself - a cosmic diagram that reminds us of our relation to the infinite, the world that extends both beyond and within our bodies and minds.

Describing both material and non-material realities, the mandala appears in all aspects of life: the celestial circles we call earth, sun, and moon, as well as conceptual circles of friends, family, and community.

The integrated view of the world represented by the mandala, while long embraced by some Eastern religions, has now begun to emerge in Western religious and secular cultures. Awareness of the mandala may have the potential of changing how we see ourselves, our planet, and perhaps even our own life purpose.

The "circle with a center" pattern is the basic structure of creation that is reflected from the micro to the macro in the world as we know it. It is a pattern found in nature and is seen in biology, geology, chemistry, physics and astronomy.

On our planet, living things are made of cells and each cell has a nucleus - all display circles with centers. The crystals that form ice, rocks, and mountains are made of atoms. Each atom is a mandala.

Within the Milky Way galaxy is our solar system and within our solar system, is Earth. Each is a mandala that is part of a larger mandala. Flowers, the rings found in tree trunks and the spiraling outward and inward of a snail's shell all reflect the primal mandala pattern.

Wherever a center is found radiating outward and inward, there is wholeness a mandala. Representing the universe itself, a mandala is both the microcosm and the macrocosm, and we are all part of its intricate design. The mandala is more than an image seen with our eyes; it is an actual moment in time. It can be can be used as a vehicle to explore art, science, religion and life itself. The mandala contains an encyclopedia of the finite and a road map to infinity.

Carl Gustav Jung said that a mandala symbolizes "a safe refuge of inner reconciliation and wholeness." It is "a synthesis of distinctive elements in a unified scheme representing the basic nature of existence." Jung used the mandala for his own personal growth and wrote about his experiences.

It is said by Tibetan Buddhists that a mandala consists of five "excellencies"
The teacher - The message - The audience - The site - The time .

When you look at the mandala
you look into the center of
all that ever existed 
or that will exist
at that exact moment in time

C. G. Jung

The Burke/Lonvig Model is widely based on Jung's work, which I admire. What I admire the most, however, is his openness.
His openness to foreign cultures, other branches of science, art - yes anything.

However his openness to alchemy and astrology is admirable - but hard to comprehend.

At some place I read, that alchemy was predecessor to chemystry and astrology was
predecessor to astronomy, which makes it a little easier to comprehend.












PowerPoint or OpenOffice.org

to manage "Slide Show",
which is a .ppt file

If you do not have PowerPoint installed on you computer you can
use OpenOffice.org Impress, which is free of charge.
Click on http://www.openoffice.org/
and download the OpenOffice package free of charge.

Adobe Reader to manage "Print Slide Show",
which is a .pdf file

If you do not have Adobe Reader installed on you computer you can
download it free of charge.
Click on Adobe Reader and choose download.


E-mails:
Stephen@Burke.dk lonvig@mail.dk
Other Burke and Lonvig web sites:
www.Burke.dk
www.Lonvig.dk
www.lonvig.biz - Prices
www.BurkeLonvig.com - the Burke/Lonvig Model

 
FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
COPYRIGHTS STEPHEN JOSEPH BURKE AND ASBJORN LONVIG


Stephen Joseph Burke, Irish
Organizational psychologist
graduated from University of Dublin and University of Aarhus

 Asbjorn Lonvig
Asbjorn Lonvig, Danish

Artist, designer, sculptor, fairy tale writer and software engineer by IBM



Burke/lonvig logo - Mandala - The Burke/Lonvig Model - by Irish psychologist, Stephen Burke, and Danish artsiest Asbjorn Lonvig
Burke/lonvig logo - Mandala - The Burke/Lonvig Model - by Irish psychologist, Stephen Burke, and Danish artsiest Asbjorn Lonvig
Burke/lonvig logo - Mandala - The Burke/Lonvig Model - by Irish psychologist, Stephen Burke, and Danish artsiest Asbjorn Lonvig
Burke/lonvig logo - Mandala - The Burke/Lonvig Model - by Irish psychologist, Stephen Burke, and Danish artsiest Asbjorn Lonvig
Burke/lonvig logo - Mandala - The Burke/Lonvig Model - by Irish psychologist, Stephen Burke, and Danish artsiest Asbjorn Lonvig
Burke/lonvig logo - Mandala - The Burke/Lonvig Model - by Irish psychologist, Stephen Burke, and Danish artsiest Asbjorn Lonvig
Burke/lonvig logo - Mandala - The Burke/Lonvig Model - by Irish psychologist, Stephen Burke, and Danish artsiest Asbjorn Lonvig
Burke/lonvig logo - Mandala - The Burke/Lonvig Model - by Irish psychologist, Stephen Burke, and Danish artsiest Asbjorn Lonvig